Introduction

This blog contains regular postings relating to the Traditional Latin Liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church. It includes regular commentary on the saints days and the liturgical cycle, with brief background and extracts from the liturgy both in Latin and English. Much of the material has been extracted from the 'St Andrew's Daily Missal', Dom Gueranger's 'Liturgical Year', or similar sources.

Related website: http://www.liturgialatina.org/





Sunday, 14 February 2016

14th February, St Valentine, Priest and Martyr

St Valentine, Priest and Martyr

St. Valentine was a holy priest of Rome who was martyred under the Emperor Aurelian in 270. He co-operated in the Saviour's Redemption "by bearing the cross after Him" (Gospel). "Having made the sacrifice of his life for Him, he finds it again" (Ibid.), for, "victorious in his terrible fight" (Epistle), God "crowns him in heaven with glory and honour" (Offertory).

Sharing in a spirit of penitence the redeeming sufferings of the Saviour, let us ask Him "through the intercession of St. Valentine, to be delivered from all the ills that threaten us" (Collect).

In virtute tua, Domine laetabitur justus: et super salutare tuum exsultabit vehementer: desiderium animae ejus tribuisti ei. * Quoniam praevenisti eum in bendictionibus dulcedinis: posuisti in capite ejus coronam de lapide pretioso.
In Thy strength, O Lord, the just man shall joy and in Thy salvation he shall rejoice exceedingly: Thou hast given him his heart's desire. For Thou hast prevented him with blessing of sweetness: Thou hast set on his head a crown of precious stones.
(Psalm 20:2-3,4 from the Introit of Mass)

Praesta, quaesumus, omnipotens Deus: ut, qui beati Valentini Martyris tui natalitia colimus, a cunctis malis imminentibus, ejus intercessione, liberemur.
Grant, we beseech Thee, O almighty God, that we who keep the festival of Thy holy martyr Valentine, may be delivered by his intercession from all dangers that threaten us.
 
From the Catholic Encyclopaedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15254a.htm

1st Sunday in Lent

1st Sunday in Lent

Station at St John Lateran

Originally the forty days of penance were counted from this Sunday. The liturgical gathering of the "station" takes place to-day, as it was since the fourth century, at Saint John Lateran, which is the patriarchal basilica of the Bishops of Rome. At its first consecration, it was dedicated to "Saint Saviour," a name which calls to mind the Redemption accomplished by our Blessed Lord.

Immediately after His baptism, our Lord began to prepare for His public life by a fast of forty days in the mountainous desert which stretches between Jericho and the mountains of Judea. It was there that He was tempted by Satan, who wished to discover whether the son of Mary was in reality the Son of God (Gospel).

As in the case of Adam, he adresses his first attack to the senses. Our Lord is hungry and the tempter suggests to Him that He should turn stones into bread. In the same way he tries, during these forty days, to make us give up our fasting and mortification. This is the concupiscence of the flesh.

The devil had promised our first parent that he should be as God. Now he takes our Lord to the pinnacle of the Temple and tries to induce Him to let Himself be carried by the angels through the air amidst the applause of the crowds below. Satan tempts us by pride, which is opposed to the spirit of prayer and meditation on God's word. This is the pride of life.

Finally, just as he had promised Adam a knowledge which like that of God Himself, should enable him to know all things, so Satan assures Jesus that he will make Him ruler over all created things if He will fall at his feet and worship him. In the same way the devil seeks to attach us to temporal goods, when we ought, by alms and works of charity, to be doing good to our neighbour. This is the concupiscence of the eyes or avance.

Since the "word of the Spirit is the word of God", our Lord made use of the ninetieth psalm against Satan, and this is the theme of the whole Mass and is found again and again in the office of the day. "His truth shall cover thee with a shield," says the psalmist. This psalm is, therefore, the ideal psalm for Lent as a special time of warfare against the devil. Again, the eleventh verse, "He hath given His angels charge over thee, to keep thee in all thy ways," recurs in Vespers like a refrain during the whole season. We find the entire psalm in the Tract, which reminds us of the old custom of singing psalms during certain parts of the Mass. Some of its verses make up the Introit with its verse, the Gradual, the Communion and the Offertory, which last was fonnerly composed, in to-day's mass, of three verses instead of one, following the order of the threefold temptation as recorded in the Gospel.

Side by side with this psalm the Epistle, certainly dating from the time of Saint Leo, sounds one of the characteristic notes of Lent. There Saint Paul borrows a text of Isaias: "In an accepted time have I heard thee, and in the day of salvation have I helped thee." "Behold," says the apostle, "now is the acceptable time, behold now is the day of salvation" (Epistle and first nocturn). On this Saint Leo comments: "Although there is no season of the year which is not rich in divine gifts and in which we by God's grace do not find immediate access to His mercy; nevertheless at this time when the return of the day on which we are redeemed summons us to fulfill all the duties of Christian piety, the souls of Christians must be stirred with more zeal for spiritual progress, and possessed of a very great confidence in almighty God. In this manner, with pure souls and bodies, shall we celebrate this mystery of the Lord's Passion, sublime beyond all others. True, we ought always to be in the divine presence, just as much as on the Easter feast. But because this spiritual vigour is the possession of only a few, while, on the one hand, the weakness of the flesh leads to any very severe observance being relaxed, and on the other, the varied occupations of this life share and divide our interest, it necessarily happens that the dust of the world soils the hearts even of religious themselves. This divine institution has been planned with great profit to our salvation in a manner that the exercises of these forty days may help us to regain the purity of our souls, making up, in a way, for the faults of the rest of the year, by fasting and pious deeds. However, we must be careful to give no one the least cause of complaint or scandal, so that our general behaviour may not be inconsistent with our fasting and penance.. For it is useless to reduce the nourishment of the body unless the soul departs from sin" (Second nocturn).

In this "acceptable time" and in these "days of salvation" let us purify ourselves with the Church {Collect), "in fastings, in chastity," by zeal in hearing and meditating on the word of God and by charity unfeigned (Epistle).


Invocabit me, et ego exaudiam eum: eripiam eum et glorificabo eum: longitudine dierum adimplebo eum. * Qui habitat in adjutorio Altissimi; in protectione Dei coeli commorabitur.
He shall cry to me, and I will hear him: I will deliver him, and I will glorify him: I will fill him with length of days. * He that dwelleth in the aid of the Most high, shall abide under the protection of the God of Heaven. (Psalm 90:15-16 from the Introit of Mass)

Deus, qui Ecclesiam tuam annua quadragesimali observatione purificas: praesta familiae tuae, ut quod a te obtinere abstinendo nititur, hoc bonis operibus exsequatur.
O God, who purifiest thy Church by the yearly observation of Lent: grant that what thy children endeavour to obtain of thee by abstinence, they may put in execution by good works.
(Collect)

A cunctis nos, quaesumus, Domine, mentis et corporis defende periculis: et intercedente beata et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, beatis Apostolis Tuis Petro et Paulo, atque beato N., et omnibus Sanctis, salutem nobis tribue benignus et pacem, ut destructis adversitatibus et erroribus universis, Ecclesia Tua secura Tibi serviat libertate.
Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body; that through the intercession of the blessed and glorious ever Virgin Mary, Mother of God, together with blessed Joseph, Thy blessed apostles Peter and Paul, and blessed N., and all the saints, mercifully grant us safety and peace; that all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom.
(For the intercession of the Saints)

Omnipotens sempiterna Deus, qui vivorum dominaris simul et mortuorum, omniumque misereris quos tuos fide et opera futuros esse praenoscis: te supplices exoramus; ut, pro quibus effundere preces decrevimus, quosque vel praesens saeculum adhuc in carne retinet, vel futurum jam exutos corpore suscepit, intercedentibus omnibus Sanctis tuis, pietatis tuae clementia omnium delictorum suorum veniam consequantur.
O almighty and eternal God, who hast dominion over both the living and the dead, and hast mercy on all whom Thou foreknowest shall be Thine by faith and good works: we humbly beseech Thee that all for whom we have resolved to make supplication whether the present world still holds them in the flesh or the world to come has already received them out of the body, may, through the intercession of all Thy saints, obtain of Thy goodness and clemency pardon for all their sins.
(For the Living and the Dead)

Continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Matthew.
At that time, Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert, to be tempted by the devil. And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterwards hungry. And the tempter coming, said to him: If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread. But he answered and said: It is written, “Not by bread alone doth man live, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.” Then the devil took him into the holy city, and set him upon a pinnacle of the temple, and said to him: If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, “He hath given his Angels charge over thee, and in their hands shall they bear thee up, lest perhaps thou dash thy foot against a stone.” Jesus said to him: It is written again, “Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.” Again the devil took him up into a very high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them, and said to him: All these will I give thee, if falling down thou wilt! adore me. Then Jesus saith to him: Begone, Satan, for it is written: “The Lord thy God shalt thou adore, and him only shalt thou serve.” Then the devil left him; and behold Angels came and ministered to him.
(St Matthew 4)

Saturday, 13 February 2016

Saturday after Ash Wednesday

Saturday after Ash Wednesday

Station at St Tryphon's

The Station at Rome was at St. Tryphon's, who died a martyr in the East. This church having been destroyed, the Station was removed under Clement VIII. to a neighbouring church, that of St. Augustine.
Saturday is the day of rest, which symbolises the eternal Sabbath (Epistle). To reach it we must, during Lent, struggle by "solemn fast" (Collect) and by works of charity (Epistle) against our passions, of which the rough sea and the contrary winds spoken of in the Gospel are a figures. In this hard struggle Jesus will come to our aid (Postcommunion), as He did to the Apostles, and "heal our bodies and our souls by fasting" (Collect), as He healed all the sick in the country of Genesareth.

The Introit, Gradual, Offertory and Communion of this Mass are the same as for yesterday, since formerly this second portion of Quinquagesima week had not become a part of the Forty Days: Wednesday and Friday only were already days of liturgical gatherings.

Audivit Dominus, et misertus est mihi, Dominus factus est adjutor meus. * Exaltabo te, Domine, quoniam suscepisti me: nec delectasti inimicos meos super me.

The Lord hath heard, and hath had mercy on me: the Lord became my helper. * I will extol Thee, O Lord, for Thou hast upheld me: and hast not made my enemies to rejoice over me.
(Psalm 29:11,2 from the Introit of Mass)
Adesto, Domine, supplicationibus nostris, et concede: ut hoc solemne jejunium, quod animabus corporibusque curandis salubriter institutum est, devoto servitio celebremus.
Be mindful, O Lord, of our supplications, and grant that we may keep with devout service this solemn fast, which Thou hast wholesomely ordained for the healing of our souls and bodies.
(Collect)

A cunctis nos, quaesumus, Domine, mentis et corporis defende periculis: et intercedente beata et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, beatis Apostolis Tuis Petro et Paulo, atque beato N., et omnibus Sanctis, salutem nobis tribue benignus et pacem, ut destructis adversitatibus et erroribus universis, Ecclesia Tua secura Tibi serviat libertate.

Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body; that through the intercession of the blessed and glorious ever Virgin Mary, Mother of God, together with blessed Joseph, Thy blessed apostles Peter and Paul, and blessed N., and all the saints, mercifully grant us safety and peace; that all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom.
(For the intercession of the Saints)

Omnipotens sempiterna Deus, qui vivorum dominaris simul et mortuorum, omniumque misereris quos tuos fide et opera futuros esse praenoscis: te supplices exoramus; ut, pro quibus effundere preces decrevimus, quosque vel praesens saeculum adhuc in carne retinet, vel futurum jam exutos corpore suscepit, intercedentibus omnibus Sanctis tuis, pietatis tuae clementia omnium delictorum suorum veniam consequantur.
O almighty and eternal God, who hast dominion over both the living and the dead, and hast mercy on all whom Thou foreknowest shall be Thine by faith and good works: we humbly beseech Thee that all for whom we have resolved to make supplication whether the present world still holds them in the flesh or the world to come has already received them out of the body, may, through the intercession of all Thy saints, obtain of Thy goodness and clemency pardon for all their sins.
(For the Living and the Dead)

Wikipedia on the Basilica of Sant' Agostino: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sant%27Agostino

Friday, 12 February 2016

12th February, The Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order, Confessors

The Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order, Confessors

To-day the liturgy honours seven noble Florentines who "in 1223 enriched the Church with a new religious family " (Collect). They received by a providential circumstance, from the mouth of little children (Introit) the name of "Servants of Mary." Illustrious by their birth, these founders became still more so by the salutary influence of their Order (Communion) in France, Germany and Poland. "Their race endures for ever and their glory shall never be dimmed " (Epistle), for they survive in their disciples. Leaving everything, they retire to Monte Senario, near Florence, atone by their austerities for the sins of guilty men and, clothed in a mourning habit shown to them by the Virgin, they constantly meditate on the Passion of Jesus and the dolours of Mary at the foot of the Cross (Collect, Postcommunion).

"Burning with love for the sorrowful Mother of Jesus" (Secret) "let us join in the tears" (Collect) of the Saints whom we honour to-day, in order that "deserving to enjoy the fruits of Christ's Redemption" (Postcommunion) "we may also have a share in their joys" (Collect).

Justi decantaverunt, Domine, nomen sanctum tuum, et victricem manum tuam laudaverunt pariter:quoniam sapientia aperuit os mutum, et linguas infantium fecit disertas. * Domine Dominus noster, quam admirabile est nomen tuum in universa terra!
The just sang to Thy holy name, O Lord, they praised with one accord Thy victorious hand. For wisdom opened the mouth of the dumb, and made the tongues of infants eloquent. * O Lord our Lord, how admirable is Thy name in the whole earth.
(Wisdom 10:20-21 and Psalm 8:2 from the Introit of Mass)

Domine Jesu Christe, qui, ad recolendam memoriam dolorum sanctissimae Genitricis tuae, per septem beatos Patres nova Servorum ejus familia Ecclesiam tuam foecundasti: concede propitius; ita nos eorum consociari fletibus, ut perfruamur et gaudiis.
O Lord Jesus Christ who, in order to renew the memory of the sorrows of Thy most holy Mother, hast through the seven blessed fathers enriched Thy Church with the new Order of Servites; mercifully grant that we may be so united in their sorrows as to share in their joys.
(Collect)

From the Catholic Encyclopaedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09750a.htm

Friday after Ash Wednesday

Friday after Ash Wednesday

Station at the Church of the Holy Martyrs John and Paul.

The Station at Rome was on Mount Coelius, in the residence that the Christian senator Pammachius in the fifth century transformed into a parish church, which bears the title of SS. John and Paul. Six frescoes of that period represent the captivity and death of these two Romans, "who in the same faith and the same martyrdom were truly united as brethren".

Near this church is a hospice for pilgrims (Xenodochium Valerii). Pammachius in other directions spent his whole fortune upon the poor. The Gospel and the Postcommurnon also speak of charity.

The Epistle and Gospel declare that the external works of penance such as prayer, fasting and almsgiving, which should be practised during Lent, have no value in the sight of God unless they are accompanied by
the spirit of internal sacrifice. This spirit shows itself in works of mercy done out of consideration for our neighbour, without distinction of friend or enemy and with the sole intention of pleasing God. Let us ask for the spint of sacrifice and mercy.

Audivit Dominus, et misertus est mihi, Dominus factus est adjutor meus. * Exaltabo te, Domine, quoniam suscepisti me: nec delectasti inimicos meos super me.
The Lord hath heard, and hath had mercy on me: the Lord became my helper. * I will extol Thee, O Lord, for Thou hast upheld me: and  hast not made my enemies to rejoice over me.
(Psalm 29:11,2 from the Introit of Mass)

Inchoata jejunia, quaesumus, Domine, benigno favore prosequere: ut observantiam, quam corpociliter exhibemus, mentibus etiam sinceris exercere valeamus.
Regard with Thy loving care, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the fast which we have begun; that the abstinence which we keep with our body may be exercised with sincerity of  mind.
(Collect)

A cunctis nos, quaesumus, Domine, mentis et corporis defende periculis: et intercedente beata et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, beatis Apostolis Tuis Petro et Paulo, atque beato N., et omnibus Sanctis, salutem nobis tribue benignus et pacem, ut destructis adversitatibus et erroribus universis, Ecclesia Tua secura Tibi serviat libertate.
Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body; that through the intercession of the blessed and glorious ever Virgin Mary, Mother of God, together with blessed Joseph, Thy blessed apostles Peter and Paul, and blessed N., and all the saints, mercifully grant us safety and peace; that all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom.
(For the intercession of the Saints)

Omnipotens sempiterna Deus, qui vivorum dominaris simul et mortuorum, omniumque misereris quos tuos fide et opera futuros esse praenoscis: te supplices exoramus; ut, pro quibus effundere preces decrevimus, quosque vel praesens saeculum adhuc in carne retinet, vel futurum jam exutos corpore suscepit, intercedentibus omnibus Sanctis tuis, pietatis tuae clementia omnium delictorum suorum veniam consequantur.
O almighty and eternal God, who hast dominion over both the living and the dead, and hast mercy on all whom Thou foreknowest shall be Thine by faith and good works: we humbly beseech Thee that all for whom we have resolved to make supplication whether the present world still holds them in the flesh or the world to come has already received them out of the body, may, through the intercession of all Thy saints, obtain of Thy goodness and clemency pardon for all their sins.
(For the Living and the Dead)

On the Basilicas of SS John and Paul: http://www.cptryon.org/compassion/sum01/visual.html

Thursday after Ash Wednesday

Thursday after Ash Wednesday

Station at St George's in Velabro

The station is, since the time of Gregory II (7th century) at St George's in Velabro, one of the twenty-five parishes of Rome in the 5th century, where under the high altar is kept the head of this Christian warrior, a victim of the persecution of the Emperor Diocletian, and called by the Greeks "the great martyr."

The liturgy of today inculcates in us the spirit of prayer, which forms par of the forty days penance. It was by prayer that Ezechias obtained a prolongation of his life (Epistle) and the centurion the healing of his servant (Gospel), and it is by prayer that we shall obtain from God the strength to mortify ourselves in order that we may gain the pardon of our sins, and with it the healing of our souls and life eternal.

The Gospel in former times reminded the catechumens that through baptism they were about to enter the kingdom of heaven in place of the infidel Jews.

Remember that if sin offends God and draws upon us the scourge of His righteous anger, penance, on the contrary, appeases Him and procures for us the effects of His mercy (Collects).

Dum clamárem ad Dóminum exaudivit vocem meam ab his, qui appropínquant mihi: et humiliávit eos, qui est ante saecula, et manet in aetérnum: jacta cogitátum tuum in Dómino, et ipse te enútriet. * Exaúdi, Deus, oratiónem meam, et ne despéxeris deprecatiónem meam: intende mihi, et exáudi me.
When I cried to the Lord, He heard my voice from them that draw near to me; and He humbled them, Who is before all ages, and remains forever: cast thy care upon the Lord, and He shall sustain thee. * Hear, O God, my prayer, and despise not my supplication; be attentive to me and hear me.
(Psalm 54: 17,19-20,23,2-3 from the Introit of Mass)

Deus, qui culpa offénderis, poeniténtia placaris; preces pópuli tui supplicántis propitius réspice; et flagélla tuae iracúndiae, quae pro peccatis nostris merémur, avérte.
God, Who art offended by sin, and appeased by pe­nance, graciously regard the prayers of Thy people making supplication to Thee, and turn aside the scourge of Thy anger, which we deserve for our sins.
(Collect)

A cunctis nos, quaesumus, Domine, mentis et corporis defende periculis: et intercedente beata et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, beatis Apostolis Tuis Petro et Paulo, atque beato N., et omnibus Sanctis, salutem nobis tribue benignus et pacem, ut destructis adversitatibus et erroribus universis, Ecclesia Tua secura Tibi serviat libertate.
Defend us, we beseech Thee, O Lord, from all dangers of mind and body; that through the intercession of the blessed and glorious ever Virgin Mary, Mother of God, together with blessed Joseph, Thy blessed apostles Peter and Paul, and blessed N., and all the saints, mercifully grant us safety and peace; that all adversities and errors being overcome, Thy Church may serve Thee in security and freedom.
(For the intercession of the Saints)

Omnipotens sempiterna Deus, qui vivorum dominaris simul et mortuorum, omniumque misereris quos tuos fide et opera futuros esse praenoscis: te supplices exoramus; ut, pro quibus effundere preces decrevimus, quosque vel praesens saeculum adhuc in carne retinet, vel futurum jam exutos corpore suscepit, intercedentibus omnibus Sanctis tuis, pietatis tuae clementia omnium delictorum suorum veniam consequantur.
O almighty and eternal God, who hast dominion over both the living and the dead, and hast mercy on all whom Thou foreknowest shall be Thine by faith and good works: we humbly beseech Thee that all for whom we have resolved to make supplication whether the present world still holds them in the flesh or the world to come has already received them out of the body, may, through the intercession of all Thy saints, obtain of Thy goodness and clemency pardon for all their sins.
(For the Living and the Dead)

The continuation of the holy Gospel according to Matthew.
At that time, when Jesus had entered into Capharnaum, there came to Him a centurion, beseeching Him, and saying, Lord, my servant lieth at home sick of the palsy, and is grievously tormented. And Jesus said to him: "I will come and heal him." And the centurion making answer said: Lord, I am not worthy that Thou shouldst enter under my roof: but only say the word, and my servant shall be healed. For I also am a man subject to authority, having under me soldiers; and I say to this man, Go, and he goeth, and to another, Come, and he cometh, and to my servant, Do this, and he doeth it. And Jesus hearing this marvelled; and said to them that followed Him: "Amen I say to you, I have not found so great faith in Israel. And I say to you that many shall come from the east and from the west, and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven: but the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into exterior darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth." And Jesus said to the centurion: "Go, and as thou hast believed, so be it done to thee." And the servant was healed at the same hour.
(St Matthew 8:5-13)

Thursday, 11 February 2016

The Stational Churches of Rome

The Stational Churches of Rome

The Roman Missal states, for each of the days in Lent - as well as for a number of more solemn days throughout the year - a Stational Church in Rome. For example, on Ash Wednesday it is the Church of Santa Sabina.

This records the ancient custom of the church in Rome, whereby members of the faithful would process solemnly to that church on the stated day, and participate in the liturgy at that place.

This practice was enriched with indulgences, as the following extract from the Raccolta makes clear.

Those of us who are not in Rome can follow the stational churches in spirit, joining with the ancient Roman church - mother and mistress of all churches - as we make our Lenten pilgrimage to the sepulchre of Our Lord.

Here is a nice website with information about the Stational Churches: http://thecatholictraveler.com/lenten-station-churches-of-rome/

From the Raccolta (1866)

146. VISIT TO THE CHURCHES OF THE STATIONS.

The practice of visiting the churches of the Stations, where are preserved the sacred memorials of the saints, and especially of the martyrs, dates its institution from the first ages of Christianity; and on certain days in the year the people, clergy, and even Popes, used to go there in procession to pray. This pious and time-honoured devotion, constantly maintained, moved Pope Gregory the Great to make a list of the Stations, assigning time churches to be visited, not only during Lent, but also on certain other days and times in the year and these days he ordered to be inserted in the Roman Missal, as is related by John the Deacon in his Life of St. Gregory, book ii. cc. 2 and 6.

In order to induce the faithful to make these visits to the churches of the Stations on the appointed days, and to pray there according to the intention of the Sovereign Pontiff, the same Pope St. Gregory, and others his successors, granted various Indulgences, which were all confirmed afresh for ever by Pope Pius VI. in a decree of the S. Congr. of Indulgences, July 9, 1777; a list of these Indulgences will presently be given, as well as of the days and churches of the Stations.

Afterwards, Leo XII., motu proprio, given through the same S. Congr. of Indulgences, Feb. 28, 1827, granted -
i. An indulgence of forty years and as many quarantines, to all the faithful, every time that during Lent, with contrite hearts and devotion, they visit the churches of the Stations in the manner he prescribed; and he ordered this method of visiting the churches to be published in a book for the purpose printed at the press of the Camera Apostolica. He granted also -
ii. A plenary indulgence to all persons who shall have made the visit as above three times, each visit on a different day; to be gained on any one day when, being penitent, they shall, after Confession and Communion, visit some church or public oratory, and pray there for our holy mother the Church, etc.
The method prescribed to be used is as follows: First, to visit some church, and say there the prayers appointed in the book, to the Blessed Sacrament, to the Blessed Virgin, and to the holy martyrs; then to go to the church of the Station, saying on the way the psalm Miserere, five Pater noster’s, five Ave Maria's, and five Gloria Patri's, and then the Steps of the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ; and lastly, whilst at the church itself, to say the Litanies of the Saints with the versicles and prayers assigned, and at the end the psalm De profundis, etc. All unlearned persons, however, and others who do not possess this book of the Stations, may gain the same Indulgences by saying at the two churches which they visit such prayers as their own devotion suggests to them and as are suitable to their capacity; and while they go from one church to the other, they are to say a third part of their rosary with the Litanies; and on leaving the church of the Station, to end their visit with the psalm De profundis, or else with one Pater noster, one Ave Maria, and a Requiem aeternam for the holy souls in purgatory.

The same Pontiff declared his will that all nuns and others dwelling in monasteries and communities should participate in the benefit of these Indulgences, provided that they keep the method prescribed and visit their own churches; and he also extended these Indulgences to the sick and to prisoners, provided they supply what they are unable to perform by doing some good work enjoined them by their own confessor.

Note, that although it is only necessary to visit one church in order to gain the Indulgences, there are on certain days, besides the churches set down in the Roman Missal for the Stations, several other churches enjoying the same Indulgences through grants of various Sovereign Pontiffs; thus we may instance the grant of Leo XII. above named, who, by a Brief of Jan. 8, 1828, confirmed a privilege already granted by Clement VIII., Feb. 4, 1603, viz, that the church of St. Gregory on the Celian Hill should be one of the stational churches for the Friday after Ash-Wednesday whilst at time same time he desired that on the second Sunday in Lent there should be another Station at this church, as appears from a notice of his Eminence the Cardinal-Vicar, Feb. 20, 1828.

DAYS AND CHURCHES OF THE STATIONS IN ROME.

Jan. 1. Circumcision of our Lord Jesus Christ. Station, St. Mary beyond the Tiber. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Jan. 6. The Epiphany of our Lord. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Septuagesima Sunday. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Sexagesima. St. Paul, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Quinquagesima. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Ash-Wednesday. St. Sabina in St. Alexius, and St. Mary in Cosmedin, called Bocca della Verità. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Thursday after Ash Wednesday. St. George in Velabro, and the church of Jesus and Mary. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Friday. SS. John and Paul, and St. Gregory, on the Celian Hill. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Tryphon, and St. Augustine. The same indulgence.
First Sunday in Lent. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Peter’s Chains and St. John della Pigna. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Anastasia. The same indulgence.
Wednesday (Ember day). St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday. St. Laurence in Pane e Perna. The same indulgence.
Friday (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Second Sunday in Lent. St. Mary in Domnica, called the Church of the Navicella, and St. Gregory, on the Celian. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Mary Major and St. Clement. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Balbina. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. St. Cecilia beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence..
Thursday. St. Mary beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Vitalis. The same indulgence.
Saturday. SS. Marcellinus and Peter’, near the Lateran Basilica. The same indulgence.
Third Sunday in Lent. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Monday. St. Mark, The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Pudentiana. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. SS. Sixtus, Nereus, and Achilleus. The same indulgence.
Thursday. SS. Cosmas and Damian, in the Forum. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Laurence in Lucina. The same indulgence.
Saturday. SS. Caius and Susanna, and St. Mary of time Angels, at the Baths. The same indulgence.
Fourth Sunday in Lent. The Holy Cross in Jerusalem. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Monday. The Four Saints crowned with Martyrdom. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Tuesday. St. Laurence ins St. Damasus, and St. Andrew della Valle. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. St. Paul, outside the Gates. The same indulgence.
Thursday. SS. Martin and Silvester, on the Hills, and St. Silvester in Capite. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Eusebius and St. Bibiana. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Nicholas in Carcere. The same indulgence.
Passion Sunday. St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Lazarus. The same indulgence.
Monday. St. Crysogonus, beyond the Tiber. The same indulgence.
Tuesday. St. Cyriacus, and St. Mary on the Broad Way, and SS. Quiricus and Julitta, on the Hills. The same indulgence.
Wednesday. St. Marcellus. The same indulgence.
Thursday. St. Apollinaris. The same indulgence.
Friday. St. Stephen, on the Celian, called the Round Church of Stephen. The same indulgence.
Saturday. St. Johns before the Latin Gate, and St. Caesareus. The same indulgence.
Palm Sunday. St. John Lateran. Indulgence of twenty-five years and twenty-five quarantines.
Monday in Holy Week. St. Praxede. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Tuesday in Holy Week. St. Prisca, and St. Mary at the Gate of the People. The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Holy Week. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Holy Week. St. John Lateran. Plenary indulgence, after Confession and Communion.
Good Friday. Holy Cross at Jerusalem. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Holy Saturday. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Easter Day. St. Mary Major. Plenary indulgence; after Confession and Communion.
Easter Monday. St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Onuphrius. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Easter Tuesday. St. Paul, outside the Walls, The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Easter Week. St. Laurence, outside the the Walls. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Easter Week. The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Friday in Easter Week. St. Mary of the Martyrs, called La Rotunda (The Round Church). The same indulgence.
Saturday in Easter Week. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Low Sunday. St. Pancratius and St. Mary della Scala. The same indulgence.
April 25. Feast of St. Mark the Evangelist. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Rogation Monday. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Rogation Tuesday. St. John Lateran. The same indulgence.
Rogation Wednesday. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Ascension Day. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Plenary indulgence; after Confession and Communion.
Saturday, Vigil of Pentecost. St. John Lateran. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Whit-Sunday. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Whit-Monday. St. Peter's Chains. The same indulgence.
Whit-Tuesday. St. Anastasia, The same indulgence.
Wednesday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Thursday in Whitsun-Week. St. Laurence, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.
Friday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday in Whitsun-Week (Ember Day). Eve of the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity. St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence.
Wednesday in September (Ember day). St. Mary Major. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Friday in September (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostle’s, The same indulgence.
Saturday in September (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican. The same indulgence..
First Sunday in Advent. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Second Sunday in Advent. Holy Cross in Jerusalem. The same indulgence.
Third Sunday in Advent. St. Peter, on the Vatican. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Wednesday in December (Ember day). St. Mary Major. Indulgence of ten years and ten quarantines.
Friday in December (Ember day). The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Saturday in December (Ember day). St. Peter, on the Vatican The same indulgence.
Fourth Sunday in Advent. The Twelve Holy Apostles. The same indulgence.
Dec. 24. Christmas Eve. St. Mary Major. Indulgence of fifteen years and fifteen quarantines.
Dec. 25. Christmas Day. First Mass. Altar of the Holy Crib, in St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Second Mass. St. Anastasia. The same indulgence.
Third Mass and the rest of the day . St. Peter, on the Vatican, and St. Mary Major. Plenary indulgence, after Confession and Communion.
Dec. 26. St. Stephen the First Martyr. St. Stephen on the Celian Hill, commonly called the Round Church of St. Stephen. Indulgence of thirty years and thirty quarantines.
Dec. 27. St. John the Apostle and Evangelist. St. Mary Major. The same indulgence.
Dec. 28. The Holy Innocents. St. Paul, outside the Walls. The same indulgence.

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